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Call For Papers
 

Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal

Deadline: November 10, 2006

Call for Abstracts/Papers

Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy:
Theorizing the Non-Ideal

This volume is to be published by Kluwer Academic Publishing as part of a series on Feminist Philosophy. The series will include five separate books on: Feminism and Aesthetics; Feminist Philosophy of Religion; Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science; Feminist History of Philosophy; and Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy.

Series editor: Elizabeth Potter
Volume editor: Lisa Tessman

This volume will collect feminist essays that self-consciously develop non-idealizing approaches to either ethics or social and political philosophy (or both). The value of a non-idealizing theoretical approach, and its relationship to feminist theorizing, is considered, for instance, in Charles Mills’ “‘Ideal Theory’ as Ideology” (in Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory, ed. Peggy DesAutels and Margaret Urban Walker, Rowman & Littlefield, 2004) where he refers to non-idealizing approaches as befitting of feminist and critical race theory. Mills’ claim is that engaging in a certain sort of idealizing—theorizing that relies “on idealization to the exclusion, or at least marginalization, of the actual”—constitutes an ideological move that makes it all the more difficult to understand the workings of oppression and to transform actual, non-ideal, unjust societies into more just societies.

Each of the essays submitted for this volume should do at least one of two things, namely either a) serve as an instance of work that is rooted in actual, non-ideal conditions, and that, as such, is able to consider any of the many questions relevant to subordinated people; or b) reflect theoretically on the significance of non-idealizing as an approach to feminist ethics or social and political philosophy, by exploring questions such as: How do traditional issues in social, political, and moral philosophy appear differently when one assumes background conditions of multiple systems of oppression, and correspondingly assumes subjects who have been shaped by these conditions? Do the terms of the debates change in the literatures on, for instance, just war theory, social contract theory, theories of distribution, democratic theory, or theories of human rights, when one insists on using the actual rather than the idealized as a starting point? Do traditional ethical frameworks need to be significantly revised if one posits a non-idealized moral subject, and in particular a moral subject who is affected by systems of oppression? How are the versions of naturalism that have come to characterize feminist ethical works related to a commitment to non-ideal theorizing, and how does naturalized theory help uncover the workings of oppression?

Those interested in submitting an essay for this volume should send a 200 word abstract by Nov. 10th, 2006, to be followed by a preliminary draft (at least 3,000 words) of the submission by February 16th, 2007. Authors whose abstracts propose an essay that will clearly not fit in to the volume will be notified of this. Acceptance decisions will be based on the preliminary draft. Authors whose submissions are accepted on the basis of the preliminary draft will have until approximately August 2007 to complete their essays (8,500 word maximum). Abstracts and submissions should be sent electronically to Lisa Tessman at: Ltessman@binghamton.edu.

Erratic Impact is not responsibile for the content or accuracy of any CFP information.

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