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Call For Papers
 

Vice over Virtue: Debating the Morality of Art

Deadline: April 20, 2011

Vice over Virtue: Debating the Morality of Art
The Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) will hold its 67th annual meeting Nov. 9-12, 2011, in Savannah, Georgia, hosted by the Savannah College of Art and Design

Papers are invited for the session titled: "Vice over Virtue: Debating the Morality of Art"

Many people prefer villains to heroes. Yet, what are the consequences when anti-heroes, and transgressive behaviors or themes, are overtly celebrated in visual art, thereby calling into question the morality of art itself? Since its illustrious heyday as an arbiter of didactic moral lessons in the academies of Europe and Great Britain, art has been upheld by critics, academies, writers, and others as the foundational stronghold of society’s integrity. Nevertheless, famous depictions of vice, and a flagrant disregard for art’s supposed moral responsibilities, have been a part of art’s history since the dawn of the academic institutions that dictated such expectations. Papers considering the moments in which art’s moral value, or immoral influence, reflected such cultural debates are invited. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: censorship under the Council of Trent, popular illustrations of villains, such as Honoré Daumier’s political caricatures, or the dandy and decadent culture in fin-de-siècle imagery, Rococo cabinet paintings, indulgent scenes of Victorian era fallen women, illustrated series of ‘wild west’ villains, 1960s counter-culture films, and art representing politically-unaccepted viewpoints. Applicants examining any era of art history, employing any methodology, are welcome.

Submission Guidelines: Submit your 300-word abstract, along with a c.v., via e-mail to the session chair by April 20, 2011 Session Chair: Dr. Sarah Lippert

Erratic Impact is not responsibile for the content or accuracy of any CFP information.

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