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Conference & Publication Calls for Papers

Call For Papers
 

digital humanities & rhetoric

Deadline: May 02, 2011

To rhetoricians working in the digital humanities,

In collaboration with the NEH Office of Digital Humanities (ODH), the Research Board of
the National Communication Association will be sponsoring a special session at the 2011
NCA annual convention designed to identify communication scholarship suitable for ODH
grants and publication in the digital humanities. Interested scholars should prepare a
1-2 description of their project. Proposals should be sent as a Word document attachment
to Trish Suchy (psuchy@lsu.edu) by no later than noon CST Monday May 2, 2011.

An overview of the session is included below. If you would like a more detailed
description, please contact Rob Asen (rbasen@wisc.edu) or Trish Suchy (psuchy@lsu.edu).

Session Title: “Voicing the Digital Humanities: A Brainstorm”

Sponsor: Research Board

Format: Roundtable

Chair: Patricia A. Suchy (Louisiana State University)

Session Participants: 8-12 contributors TBA, drawn from proposals solicited by chair

Respondents: Marcy Chvasta (California State University Stanislaus; Editor, Liminalities)
Michael LeVan (University of South Florida; Editor, Liminalities)
Tara McPherson (University of Southern California; Editor, Vectors)
Program Officer TBA, National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities

Description: This session adapts the National Endowment for the Humanities Office of
Digital Humanities’ (ODH) “lightning round” start-up grant presentation method to create
a brainstorm of digital humanities projects in Communication Studies. ODHÂ’s start-up
grant program “is designed to award small grants to spur innovation, test out new ideas,
and act as a catalyst to the field.” Participants will offer three-minute précis of
potential digital humanities projects; an ODH program officer and editors of the
e-journals Vectors and Liminalities will respond. The goals of this roundtable will be
to identify themes and specific projects for communication scholars in the digital
humanities and to help scholars develop projects to submit to digital humanitiesÂ’
journals and/or ODH start-up grant proposals.

Proposal: The challenge is to write a 1-2 page (no more!) description of a project youÂ’d
like to do in the Digital Humanities. As the session is a brainstorm, the expectation is
that you will dream a bit. It may be a multi-media essay youÂ’d like to stage; it may be
a project to map humanities data or develop an application and content for mobile phones
that connects with oral histories or tourism narratives; it may be a data mining project
to study performance history—etc. Please feel free to collaborate with another or others
(in the communication fields or not); digital humanities scholarship is a particularly
rich environment for collaboration. Please note that while Liminalities and Vectors both
publish projects that are or could be called “art,” NEH does not fund artistic works, nor
do they fund social science. Therefore, although your idea might contain aesthetic or
social science elements or study art (performance, for example), for the purposes of this
session, please make sure it is a humanities project in
communication studies. The distinctions are, as we all know, sometimes blurry, but itÂ’s
important that you are proposing an idea to which ODH can respond.

Include in this mini-proposal:

1. Title of the project
2. Your name, names of co-authors or PIs or collaborators and their disciplines
3. Institutional affiliation(s)
4. Status of NCA membership
5. WHAT: Brief description of the project, including location(s) if they are
important.
6. HOW: A paragraph on method. DonÂ’t worry about the how technologically if you
are not conversant with the technology your idea would require. At this point you may
express needs—ways you’d like to proceed, even if you don’t know how precisely they might
be possible, technologically or otherwise.
7. WHY: Be sure to include a paragraph on significance; also address your own
attraction to the idea.
8. PRESENTING YOUR IDEA: Sketch very briefly how you would present your
mini-proposal in lightning round fashion. I would hope that presenters donÂ’t just read
the proposal, but that they present the idea in as compelling a way as possible within a
strict 3-minute time limit. Consider using digital media in your presentation in a
small, contained way—projected images, sounds, etc.

Erratic Impact is not responsibile for the content or accuracy of any CFP information.

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