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Call For Papers
 

The Nineteenth-Century Songster: A Cultural History

Deadline: February 01, 2012

The Nineteenth-Century Songster: A Cultural History

 Edited by Derek B. Scott (University of Leeds), Patrick Spedding (Monash University) and Paul Watt (Monash University)

 This project aims to fill a major gap in nineteenth-century music by providing the first large-scale history of one of the century’s most important but neglected cultural artifacts, the songster. Broadly defined, a songster is a book of songs (comprising words or music, or both) for a variety of social, ideological or political purposes.

 It is expected that the book will cover the ‘long nineteenth century’, from the late 1700s to the early 1900s, and will be pitched to a major international scholarly press.

 We invite submissions from scholars working on any aspect of the history of songsters, in any discipline. We offer the following headings and outlines as possible topics:

  • Repertoire
    • -Genre: e.g., drinking songs, love songs, political songs
    • -Audience: e.g., women, men, armed forces, political parties
  • Musical analysis
    • -Use of appropriation and parody of tunes, song titles and melodies
    • -Editions of sheet music
  • Textual analysis
    • -Use of particular words and phrases across editions or a similar genre of songs
    • -Role and function of parts of speech including alliteration, double entendre, euphemism
  • Performance and reception
    • -Accounts of the success or efficacy of songbooks and quality of performance
    • -Biographies of composers, singers, musical institutions
  • Transmission
    • -‘New World’ connections and cultural transfer including trans-Atlantic and Antipodean links
    • -Circulation of songbooks between venues/institutions (e.g. libraries) and singers
  • Production and manufacture
    • -Typography, use of illustrations; extent and use of music
    • -Printers, vendors; i.e., modes of distribution and consumption

At this stage it is envisaged that chapters will be around 5000-7000 words each (including references). A modest number of illustrations are encouraged. (These guidelines are subject to change.)

 Abstracts of approximately 250 words (in addition to a 150 word biographical summary) should be emailed to Dr Paul Watt (paul.watt@monash.edu) by 1 February 2012.

 Dr Paul Watt
 School of Music—Conservatorium
 Monash University VIC 3800  
Australia

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