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Call For Papers
 

The Future of the Left

Deadline: December 31, 2011

CFP: The Future of the Left

Radical Orthodoxy: A Journal of Theology, Philosophy and Politics is an internationally peer reviewed journal dedicated to the exploration of academic and policy debates that interface between theology, philosophy and the social sciences. 

The editorial policy of the journal is radically non-partisan and the journal welcomes submissions from scholars and intellectuals with interesting and relevant things to say about both the nature and trajectory of the times in which we live.  The journal intends to publish papers on all branches of philosophy, theology aesthetics (including literary, art and music criticism) as well as pieces on ethical, political, social, economic and cultural theory.

The journal will be published four times a year; each volume comprising of standard, special, review and current affairs issues. The journal will pursue an innovative editorial policy by publishing pieces both longer and shorter than those typically published in mainstream academic journals (alongside those of standard length).

The journal invites authors to submit papers for a special issue on The Future of the Left - to appear in June 2012.

As has been well documented, the ‘neo-liberal’ version of capitalism that has been the dominant political-economic paradigm since the mid 1970s is today experiencing a profound crisis. The mechanism for distributing financial surpluses from East to West has broken down giving rise to anxieties about a new ‘age of austerity’ in Western societies.  In stepping in to fill the economic void, the western state it seems is now in the process of bankrupting itself in a vain attempt to maintain economic demand and shareholder value in the wider economy. In the light of these historic economic developments, there is now a growing recognition that new forms of ‘political radicalism’ - long dormant due to the distractions of neo-liberalism’s deregulated market dynamics - is likely to re-emerge across the western world (and in this way, in a perverse inversion of history, peripheral European states like Greece may again become the model of political futurity for the west as a whole).  

However, the historic intellectual mystery of these times is that we now experience a profound ‘crisis of capitalism’ without a sustained and significant parallel critique from the mainstream left.  How to explain this?  Has the rise of Islamic fundamentalism facilitated a profound cultural shift to the right?  Or has the left itself imploded under the weight of a left-liberal agenda that has blunted its traditional radicalism and powers of social critique? Whatever the explanation, clearly we need to recognise that the established parties of the left have failed adequately to respond to the structural adjustment and deflationary policies of the neo-liberal era; the main consequence of which is a profound ‘identity crisis’ for leftwing political parties and a resulting sense of inertia and incapacity with respect to a crisis that they should be exploiting to the full.

At the same time, there are many traditions on the left that precede not just the false ‘third way’ accommodation with capitalism but also the obsession with central state bureaucracy and statist authoritarianism – for instance the mutualism of Proudhon, the guild socialism of GDC Cole or the Christian socialism of Karl Polanyi. Linked to this, is the issue of civil society and the autonomy of intermediary institutions, not least religious bodies. If the left is not wedded to the central state, then perhaps the whole modern dialectic of left versus right needs to be questioned, alongside with the alleged bias on the left in favour of aggressive secularism.   Might the left today need to ‘reconnect’ with the Christian traditions that both gave rise to and supported working class solidaritaristic politics in the first historical instance?

This issue will explore these questions.  However, the journal will also welcome submissions that address the following issues:

  • Localism, Mutualism and the Traditions of the Left
  •  The idea Hegemony and Post-Hegemonic Politics
  •  The idea of ‘crisis’ in relation to both the state and the market
  •  The Left and the end of opposition between ‘bourgeois’ and ‘bohemian’
  •  Christianity and Cultural Politics
  • The Metaphysics of Production
  • The Left and the Question of Civilisation
  • The Left and Islam
  • The Left and the ‘New Economy’
  • The Left and the Critique of Bureaucracy
  • Intellectual Property, Creativity and the Left
  • Politics at the end of the ‘Organisational Age’
  • Progressive Politics in the Age of Ecology
  • Individualism, Conformity and the Left
  • The viability of ‘class politics’
  • Religious responses the current crisis and their articulation with a ‘politics of the left’
  • The function of ideology in relation to contemporary neo-liberal environments
  • The Left and globalism
  • The Left and the new neo-liberal settlement
  • Conservatism as an alternative to left-wing critiques of neo-liberalism
  • The value and significance of ‘protest’ and ‘resistance’
  • The Left and ‘green modernisation’

Deadline for submissions is Dec 31st 2011. Radical Orthodoxy: A Journal of Theology, Philosophy and Politics uses the Open Journal Systems open access journal, and encourages submissions to be posted to this journal's website by creating an account, signing up as an 'author', and submitting the manuscript through the manuscript submission process.

Erratic Impact is not responsibile for the content or accuracy of any CFP information.

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